Friday, February 23, 2018

Psycho-Cybernetics and Self Image

Dr. Maxwell Maltz, MD was a cosmetic surgeon. In his practice, he operated on improving the facial or physical appearances of individuals.

It's a drive too on his part to improve people's self image through his specialized work.

What he discovered was, despite evidenced improvements in appearance, "gains" in self image do not necessarily follow in the minds of patients.

A lot of his patients would still feel "ugly" and dismayed about themselves, even after their successful surgeries.

In his famous long-time bestseller, "Psycho-Cybernetics and Self-Fulfillment," Dr. Maltz teaches about self image, goals, and happiness.


It's interesting, Dr. Maltz's coining of the term "psycho-cybernetics."

In original Greek roots, the word "psycho" refers to mind or soul, whereas "cybernetics" to system of control in machines.

Psycho-Cyberneyics was a system born out of Dr. Maltz's experience with his patients that struggled with their self image.

A few weeks ago, a brother of one of my long-term clients sent me an email. He's an IT specialist working in Europe.

In his query, he seemed subscribing to the idea that therapy can be reduced to a "machine," with precise or well-defined measurements, milestones, and results.

Dr. Maltz's Psycho-Cybernetics bridges the gap between mechanistic models of our mind (brain as a computer!) and the knowledge of the nature of our humanity as a lot more than machine.

We're uniquely human. And we can never be essentially reduced to machine analogies.

That is, although the dynamics of our psychological development and self growth might be best described in mechanistic terms, we're far more than that.

Such an orientation is definitely a natural part of the human process of psychotherapy and soul care.

I believe in revolution for the vast inner space of our mind and self.

Our Creator gave us brains and internal systems more wonderful than any electronic computer or guidance machine that man produces.

Such knowledge should encourage and empower us to rise above mere physical circumstances or problems.